War. And peace.

 

 

I was moved to tears.

I don’t say this lightly. I also don’t say it for dramatic effect.

I say it because as I stood there looking east over the gentle, vast, peaceful fields of Gettysburg–the spot held July 1, 1863, by the Northern Army of Virginia, before 50,000 of our nation’s boys lost their lives in three days of horrific, bloody battles–deep sadness overtook me in a heartbreaking, guttural way.

 

 

Those fields go on forever.

 

 

 

As do the 1,328 memorials, monuments and markers.

 

 

They are there to remind us

 

 

of the unimaginable price our forebears paid,

 

 

and that we should never, ever forget.

 

 

XXOO

 

I’d love to send a note each time there’s a post on The Daily Grace. Just leave your email here!

6 thoughts on “War. And peace.

  1. Dear Madam,–

    I have been shown in the files of the War Department a statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle. I feel how weak and fruitless must be any word of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.

    Yours, very sincerely and respectfully,
    – A. Lincoln

    1. Mr. President,–

      I felt it all on that battlefield. I do pray better days are ahead.

      Most sincerely,

      Another mother

  2. I’m so very glad that you have experienced the history of Gettysburg. It’s one of those inspiring places to visit. The awesomeness is breathtaking.
    (Also do get to the Grand Canyon and the western National Parks if you haven’t been there already)
    Alice

Comments are closed.