Becoming what you are surrounded by.

I’VE WRITTEN MANY TIMES referencing the teachings of Fr. Richard Rohr, a Franciscan Priest and a globally recognized ecumenical teacher who “bears witness to the universal awakening within Christian mysticism and the Perennial Tradition. ” (If you are not familiar, do click the link and read the very short description. I am no expert, but my heart glows when I read it.) The night we returned from our trip to Maine I flipped open my laptop to see the load of email I had not sifted while on vacation. There was this Rohr meditation, delivered that very day.

The Perennial Tradition constantly recognizes that we are part of something more than we are observing something. 

How does that feel to you? Rohr continues.

It feels like Maine, is what I thought. It feels like a walk through the woods on Big Cranberry Island; a quiet Acadia moment, the breeze in your hair. It feels like every view of Jordan Pond. It feels like sunset from the top of Cadillac Mountain, and the lobster boats and the rocky coast and the lighthouses and the deep dense fog.

It feels like sea glass.

Because you don’t observe Maine, is what I had already realized. You become part of it.

You are absorbed by it.

Rohr goes on.

The foundational spiritual question is this: Does one’s life give any evidence of an encounter with God? When we’ve experienced union and intimacy with the divine, what is our response? Does the encounter bring about what Paul described as the “fruits” of the Spirit: “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, trustfulness, gentleness, and self-control” ?

There are important questions–particularly in a dualistic culture–about becoming what you are surrounded by. Those we will debate another day.

But for now, I am content to soak in my memories of Maine, to (best as I can) hold on to the part of my soul that was moved and soothed and enriched by that beautiful, welcoming, earthly place.

To remember that every glorious moment of grace is born of open, full and humble connection to all that is divine.

Amen.

XXOO

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The Maine Thing.

It’s a once-in-a-lifetime summer for me, one filled with #lifegoals travel and life enhancing experiences. This is partly due to my approaching 60th birthday–what a fantastic excuse to use for all sorts of wonderful things–but also due to our great and unwavering commitment to making the most of every life opportunity. Our children are grown, our parents are gone, and what we are left with, in this in-between space, is time. The great consolation of time. Even more significant for us, I believe, is the immense blessing of our good health. Tim and I have the physical ability to go and do, and so we go and do. In fact that is exactly what we do.

This is key to every aspect of our lives. We are in The Golden Time (as articulated by our friend, David LaFuria) and we began planning for it long ago, just after Tim’s dad began suffering the cruel impact of Alzheimers, an horrific journey on which, I am sad to say, my own sweet Daddy recently followed.

(We do not take much for granted anymore, my husband and I.)

Still for me, with all the wonder and joy and grace my beautiful life holds, it is this summer, I believe, that will serve as the pinnacle. There has been a week at Music and Worship (choir camp!) in gorgeous, holy Montreat, North Carolina; there has been a week at the Appalachian Writers’ Workshop in Hindman, Kentucky; we are headed shortly to northern Virginia for a long weekend visit with dear, dear friends; we have, upcoming, the We-Cannot-Believe-This-Is-Happening trip, discussed for years, out west fly fishing with the dear souls who years ago, introduced us.

AND NOW WE ARE IN MAINE. We are in Maine in our rented house on the rocky coast above Bar Harbor, where we’ve come with our treasured friends, the Rojeks, in theoretical celebration of Tim’s 60th. It’s the first make-good of our promise to each other some years ago to take four such trips as these big birthdays just so happen to occur over four successive years. We’re not exactly on schedule, but that doesn’t matter. We’re here together now, and waking up this morning to an early, early coastal Maine sunrise filled my heart with so much joy it’s a wonder it didn’t burst.

I’ve dreamed of Maine for so long.

And finally, here I am.

WE EXPECT OUR WEEK will be spent hiking, biking, touring around. Yesterday we experienced gorgeous Bar Harbor (I have never seen such luscious flowers, anywhere) and today we may head for Acadia.

Or maybe not, who knows, as the planners downstairs–the three of them–are at this moment considering every option. I only know for sure this day will hold, for me, Lobster Roll #1 of the hundred I plan to eat over the course of these next six days.

Every window in this house is open, did I tell you that?

The air is cool, and fresh.

It feels like Maine. It smells like Maine.

It is Maine, the Maine of my dreams, and it has come to life.

XXOO

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When you’re pretty sure your spirit animal is a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.

I SPEND A GOOD BIT of time alone these days, but for the characters in the novel I am working to finish. It’s good work, solitary work, work that takes focus. And so I have routines that ground me.

  1. I am committed to an early start;
  2. I have a Yeti mug of coffee (prepared by my husband) just the way I like it: 2/3 Starbucks French Roast & 1/3 Eight O’Clock Coffee Hazelnut, skim milk heated and frothed;
  3. Quiet. And if there is not quiet, a noise machine to cancel extraneous sounds;
  4. Essential oils in the diffuser, typically Wild Orange or Tangerine for energy and optimism;
  5. Standing desk for ergonomic accuracy, better posture and less back pain (I am a believer);
  6. Desk and laptop positioned for maximum positive energy flow in my feng shui-ed mountain studio.

Seems awfully fussy, now that I write it. But it’s every bit true.

SO ON THIS PARTICULAR day my head is down and I’m well into it (and going at a pretty good pace) when I hear, just outside the studio door, peck peck peck, peck peck, peck peck. A bird, of course, a woodpecker, I imagine. But this is a metal sound, not wood, so a woodpecker pecking on what? The roof? The gutter?

This is certainly curious.

I step away from the edit. I pick up my camera, slide open the studio’s glass doors, and move onto the deck to investigate.

Sure enough he flies. But he doesn’t go far–just to the tree–the one right there, closest to me.

I raise the lens, snap a shot.

And here he comes, headed straight for me and the deck! I jump, it surprises me so, and right there on the deck’s railing he lands.

He is not three feet away! Might be two! And he is as curious as I.

We regard each other in wonder. I snap another photo, he tilts his head.

I snap one more, he looks on.

I take a step toward him and he does the same–move away he does not!–he is far too interested, apparently, in what I am doing to take off in flight.

We stay like that a good while, the baby woodpecker and I, until finally I say out loud, as much for my benefit as for his:

I do believe you are my muse. Or maybe you are my spirit animal. Yes, you are important to me little bird, and I thank you for showing up.

This he seems to acknowledge. Then he lifts off and heads back to the tree where he lands, turning once again to look at me, then takes flight.

And I slide open the glass door, step back inside. I smile, and I get myself back to work.

XXOO

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Hey. Look.

IT IS QUIET on this mountain, something that won’t surprise given that our gate is locked, our roads aren’t paved, and the nearest neighbor, of which there are only a handful, is acres and acres away. Add to this the fact we never turn on the television (but for football or evening binging) and you probably are getting the picture.

It is a gift, this silence, a mighty force that holds my introverted, introspective heart in balance.

WHY JUST LAST WEEK we arose to a particularly gentle day. It had rained during the night and the sun, still hidden by clouds and fog, created a beautiful, serene surround. The birds were singing, yes, but the meadow glistened like it had been perfectly cast to create a soft, atmospheric glow. Or not a glow, exactly, more like a wash that left it new, positively glistening.

I walked up the steps to my studio as I do each day we are here, and I got right to work. Throughout the morning I trekked those stairs down and up what must have been a thousand times. I needed my laptop; I’d forgotten my camera; where was that charger, as the dang Ipad on which I was proofing a manuscript will not hold power. On and on it went, up and down, more coffee, a scrambled egg, a cold drink of water.

Long about eleven I ran into Tim who was busy busy scraping and cleaning all manner of wood as he is spending his summer painting this house and its endless decks. You see all those spider webs? he said. This surprised me as, relatively speaking, we see fewer spiders up here than you might well suppose.

No, I said. Where?

Everywhere, he said. They are everywhere.

And sure enough, they were.

He pointed out one strung between deck railings, and then another, one railing down.

Then two more.

Up, look up, Tim said.

In the trees.

And I saw in the tall fir there were three, maybe more, no ten, no fifteen webs. Maybe twenty! On and on they went, as if the great force that had come in the night that had so perfectly adorned the meadow as a bonus had added these.

A quiet collection,

a convocation, if you will, of delicate, intricate,

breathtaking works of art.

It was something to behold, something I almost missed.

I must remember to look, I reminded myself.

I must remember to always, always look.

XXOO

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Remembering Sully and smiling.

JULY 2011. Our sweet, sweet next door neighbors, the Copes, had just put in a pool. This thrilled their tiny children (who are nearly grown—how does this happen) to no end and still the joy of those kids hardly compared to the joy of their dog. Sully swam lap after lap every morning, perfecting the corner turn and ultimately shedding 15 pounds!

SULLY SWIMS. (Check out how he maximizes every square inch of that pool.)

We lost precious Sully on Monday.

His swimming days may have been long past, but the happy he brought to all of us who loved him never wavered.

We will miss you, precious friend.

XXOO

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The Rhythm of Life

IT IS TRUE LIFE IS DIFFERENT high on this mountain. Neighbors are few and the primary consideration is not traffic or the news or even the Jeopardy champ (although that is discussed) but is, instead, the weather. We check the forecast before we go to bed at night; we check it again immediately upon rising. I suspect this is how it is for those who live a farming life, who depend on rain and soil condition and air temperature for their livelihoods as well as their daily activities. And although we don’t have so much as a vegetable garden (we go and come too much for proper maintenance) I believe what we share with them is a deep, deep connection with the land.

Part of it, for us, is simply our positioning. The sun rises each morning over the Black Mountains to our left and our bed and bedroom window face east. We leave the blind up with the great intention of waking at first light and properly greeting the day. This time of year it is a very early rising and without fail, we face it with the joy and anticipation of eager children. This is our fourth summer on this mountain and I swear to you every single sunrise is different.

Often there is rain, or clouds, or we are completely “socked in” like the peaks you see in romantic photographs. Even those days are fascinating. Every moment offers the chance for change: wind blows or fog rises and for a moment the meadow below or the ridges beyond show through. Cover will come again, or not, and still we watch with ever-present oohs and aahs.

THEN THE DAY comes. While we neither farm nor head to the city for work, we are busy. Tim, for instance, always has a big project or two over which he is fully committed. He hustles to maintain a semblance of order on the property–good heavens you simply drive into Asheville for dinner and by the time you return nature has taken over, every living green thing gaining height and girth and insistent wildness.

This summer he is also painting the house, the studio/workshop, and all 3500 square feet of decking.

soon it will all be putty gray

It is a massive job.

I write. I take my coffee across the deck and up the steps to my newly feng shui-ed studio (thank you, Mary!) where I stand in the filtered morning light and spend the next eight hours immersed in the world of my second novel. I marvel that this lifestyle allows me to be three hours in by the time I typically would have just made it to the office. I know, now, I am at my best the earlier I start (thank you, Maria!) and so I forgo every other responsibility or diversion until I have taken care of this one. I do not eat first. I do not exercise first. I do not even shower first–no one cares, so why waste my personal prime time on something that can be done later? Or not at all?

What a gigantic gift that is.

DAY PASSES, OF COURSE, the sun moving high in the sky and traveling across the ridges where it casts changing light that illumines and shadows the mountain faces. It, too, is an ever-changing show and a constant visual (and visceral) reminder that time moves on. Evening comes. It is late this time of year, soft, a slow release from the work of the day. We don’t see the orb of the sun as it sinks in the west but we do benefit greatly from the magnificent light it casts, the colors always a surprise, the hues shifting, deepening, then fading to dark.

day is nearly done

WE ARE GREATLY BLESSED to have this place, this time, this remarkable vantage point. And it’s something about which we are keenly aware every single minute. We give thanks and rejoice in the gift, in our having the youth (relatively speaking!) and the strength and the health and the stamina to make the most of all this change in geography and lifestyle offers. We never take any of that for granted. And still when the time comes to pack up and leave and we return to our regular lives–when we drive down the mountain and head for home and all it has waiting for us: work and mail and meetings and bills and decisions and appointments and Things That Must Be Dealt With–we somehow cannot seem to carry with us the beautiful awareness of the great passing of days. We are delighted to be home, of course; we love and are grateful for our equally blessed, beautiful flatlander lives. Still when we are there we once again rise with a pre-set alarm. We complain about traffic. Tim manicures the overgrown lawn and I buy things at Target.

We do not watch the sun rise or set; we rarely take time to sit together, outside, watching, waiting, listening.

THERE IS A DIFFERENT RHYTHM on this mountain, I suppose that is my point. It is one established not by us but by the earth, the sun, the moon. The critters large and small who move through our meadow.

The tall, wild grasses that grow and swing and sway in the summer breezes, the winds that pass over this rugged, ancient land.

XXOO

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Morning Song

The sun gets up early this time of year, peaking over our mountains just after 6 a.m. So if you want to catch the prettiest light, you best be standing on the deck, coffee in hand, 5:40, 5:45 at the latest. It’s well worth the early rise for me; the show is magnificent most days, and very shortly thereafter I can be settled into the studio, happily writing the morning away.

It is my favorite time of day.

As it is for this sweet friend,

who meets me there rain or shine, nearly every morning

each time heralding the glory of the new day

in song.

Joyful, unbridled song!

XXOO

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big little things

SO MUCH feels uncertain. Economies teetering, the world shaky. Lives changed in the blink of an eye.

Which makes anything of routine all the more welcome.

The hummingbirds returned to our mountain this week.

One, then two, then three, then four. Timid at first, just a quick nip from the feeder. Then more, the nectar sweet after a winter away.

And sunshine, green, and Spring was here once again.

It’s something about which we are keenly aware on this mountain. We watch the seasons like it’s a religion noting every change, every turning, every remarkable bloom.

And every time,

every single time–

we feel grateful.

XXOO

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when darkness falls

It has been a difficult season, dear ones, precious friends facing difficult news and unimaginable struggles. And my own mornings have been shadowed with the recent loss of our sweet, sweet dog. I will write more of that later, when I feel better able to tell the whole of Little Bit’s story; when I can happily share the miraculous grace that (as always) accompanied our immense heartbreak. But in the meantime I will remain in fervent prayer for all my beloveds.

And I will show, rather than describe, a bit of joy that arrived early this morning. We are in the mountains where for Easter weekend we weathered rain, and high winds, and snow.

(Yes. Snow.)
IT IS NOT SUPPOSED TO SNOW ON EASTER.

But this morning winter lifted. The skies cleared, and my heart rejoiced.

So whatever you are facing–whatever challenge is in your path, whatever pain or sadness you may hold–I hope you will remember that seasons change, and darkness subsides, and the sun rises. And I hope you will feel the buoyancy of the energy of those who love you. They are lifting you up, whether near or far away, they are holding you dear, and they are offering a prayer, or a poem, or a word, right here, right now. For you.

Amen.

XXOO

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March Madness.

And now we are racing through March! Where here in South Carolina’s midlands we are blanketed in a layer of pollen so thick it is smothering. Even showering seems a gigantic waste of time.

Has it ever been this bad?

(Do we say that every year?)

But oh, Springtime. With her forsythia and spirea, and the eager green shoots that push through winter-hard ground as if to remind us rebirth is possible. And the green/gold promise of the million baby leaf buds–the billion baby buds–their translucent unfurling the stuff of poetry.

And the birds all a twitter! The possibilities of new love! Courting and preening and feeding, beak-to-beak. Romance all around. Prime spot claiming, be it light fixture, high beam, bird house. Even an old shoe will do.

The building of the nest. One blade, one twig, one feather at a time. One morning’s work, and then another. And more until DONE, there it is, a work of art, a new home, the magical weaving (instinctual as it is) of one little family’s future.

The cradling and nurturing therein.

The risks, the threats, the circle of life.

My, my, my, the drama. It is Spring!

XXOO

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